The Digital Maturity Model

Imagine a company that is highly efficient—one that has streamlined all internal and external processes. Employees are no longer bogged down with manual, repetitive tasks. They’re able to spend more time working on projects that deliver significant impact and improve the customer experience. Thanks to this level of efficiency, the company can quickly scale or adapt to address changing customer needs and market shifts.
The organization described above has reached optimal digital maturity. In order to measure against this ideal, we identified four pillars that contribute to an organization's digital maturity:

Culture

Creating a workplace culture that welcomes change, encourages new ideas, and supports learning is crucial to the success of digital transformation. To get a sense of an organization’s culture, we asked questions about management, innovation, and adaptability.
1

Workflow Digitization

How—and how much—are organizations digitizing, streamlining, and automating workflows? To better understand their successes and struggles, we asked questions around use of paper forms and documents, reasons for digitizing processes, and involvement in workflow automation.
2

Technology

Workflow automation and digitization are only possible with the assistance of technology. To better understand the role technology plays within orgs, we asked questions about tech stack, no-code tools, tech purchase drivers, and tech audits.
3

Team Alignment

Who is involved in the digitization process, and how are teams collaborating to ensure digital transformations go smoothly? To find out, we asked questions about building workflows, sharing learnings, and communicating across departments.
4

The Four Stages of Digital Maturity

Using the digital maturity pillars, we created a data-driven digital maturity model. This model identifies four stages of digital maturity: Limited, Invested, Refined, and Optimized.

Limited

These organizations are stuck in the status quo with mostly manual, paper-based workflows that limit org-wide efficiency.

Invested

These organizations are motivated to improve efficiency and have invested in digitization for at least half of their forms and documents.

Refined

These organizations prioritize digitization and use automation to refine processes, better serve customers, and improve data practices.

Optimized

These organizations are completely digitized but continue to look for ways to optimize workflows with new technology.

Digital Maturity Framework

Pulling our pillars and stages together, we created a digital maturity framework that allows organizations to gauge where they fall.

Limited
Invested
Refined
Optimized
Workflow Digitization
A majority of workflows are manual and paper-based, using paper forms, paper documents, and wet signatures. If digital transformation efforts have begun, they are very early and limited in scope.
Motivation for digitizing is to improve efficiency and security. Close to digitizing half of the workflows, but lag behind with automating documents and digitizing signatures.
At least half of the workflows are digital. Use automation to better serve customers and believe it helps minimize mistakes. A majority of signatures are digital, and in some cases, all forms and documents are digital.
All workflows are digitized, processes are automated, and employees spend very little time on repetitive tasks. Use digitization to improve efficiency, security, and the employee experience.
Culture
There are no initiatives around eliminating paper and improving efficiency. People continue to do things the way they’ve always been done and don’t see a need for change. Don’t see the importance of tracking data on efficiency.
Employees feel micromanaged and sometimes discouraged from testing new ideas. Reliance on legacy technology and doing things the way they’ve always been done deters change. Somewhat limited with data tracking on efficiency.
Some employees feel micromanaged, but most are encouraged to explore and test new ideas. Change is accepted, although legacy technology sometimes deters efforts. Have data tracking in place, but want to expand abilities to identify inefficiencies.
Embrace change and continually search for ways to improve and adapt to market changes. Encourage employees to test new ideas and try new technology. Employees feel autonomous and have access to a variety of data points on efficiency.
Technology
Rely on mostly legacy tools and rarely change or add to tech stack. Many lack the technology to automate workflows. Tools aren’t integrated well, and getting new technology approved is very difficult. Most  struggle with project delays due to limited technical resources. No-code tools aren’t provided, and tech is only purchased as a need arises.
Tech stacks are a combination of older and newer technology.
Use a mix of tools to automate workflows with some integration issues. Most employees would like to have access to no-code tools. A lack of technical resources sometimes delays projects, and getting tools approved is somewhat difficult.
Use less legacy technology in their tech stacks. The majority use tools that are well-integrated to automate workflows. More than half provide employees with no-code tools to automate processes. New technology is purchased to help solve future problems, and it is easy to get approved. Open to adding new technology into core tech stack.
Tech stack is well-integrated and includes very little—if any—legacy technology. Employees are provided with no-code tools and find it easy to get requests for new technology approved. New tools are explored and added to the tech stack often. Projects are rarely delayed due to a lack of technical resources.
Team Alignment
Departments work independently and rarely share ideas. Lack a formal process for sharing learnings. IT usually builds workflows, but they are sometimes built by different departments. Lack consistent reporting around system costs, tech maintenance, and necessary workflow updates.
Ideas are sometimes shared across departments. The most common way of sharing learnings is through email. IT builds most workflows, but some orgs build them within each department.
Most want to improve data tracking on system efficiencies and improvements.
A majority of departments share learnings and ideas, generally through emails and meetings. Workflows are built by IT or a project management team. Find it important to track data about tools, processes, and efficiencies; most have strong tacking capabilities in place.
Learnings and ideas are frequently shared across departments. Use a variety of channels to communicate learnings, including collaboration tools, emails, and meetings. Track data on system costs, tech maintenance, and necessary workflow updates.